Tag Archives: Architecture

3D renderings are the new blueprints

Posted by , CastleView 3D:

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All the marketing gurus say that every company needs a “big, audacious idea” as its driving mission and reason for doing what it does every day.  Here’s mine for CastleView 3D:

Make 3D renderings as indispensable as blueprints or construction documents for any construction or remodeling project.

Before the blueprint was invented in the mid-1800s as a way of making copies of construction drawings, every architectural plan had to be painstakingly hand-drawn.  But the new “technology” was quickly adopted as an obvious improvement on the old ways.  Everyone could see the benefit — so why not use it?

My hope is that this same tale will someday be told about 3D CAD modeling and rendering for architectural designs.  The technology exists — why not use it to best advantage?

Yet there still seems to be resistance to the widespread adoption of 3D rendering as a standard procedure in architectural design.  Just today I got a call from a prospective client who was having trouble visualizing his new home from the plans his architect had drawn up.  He asked the architect for 3D images, “like the ones I see on HGTV,” but the architect refused, saying he just didn’t do those.  Luckily this guy was smart enough not to take “no” for an answer — always the mark of a true pioneer!  And his internet search led him to me.

Despite the inevitable holdouts (probably folks who don’t have the time or inclination to learn 3D rendering techniques), I predict that some day soon 3D renderings will become a must for all architects and home designers — not an extra or an add-on, but simply an accepted cost of doing business, like producing blueprints or construction documents.  I believe this will happen because savvy consumers will come to demand and expect it.

Nowadays, why should anyone expect a customer to be satisfied with a flat, 2-dimensional blueprint or plan, when we have the technology and expertise to show them their project in mouthwatering 3D detail?

3D Kitchen Rendering by CastleView3D.com

3D kitchen rendering by CastleView 3D

My big, audacious idea is the driving force behind what I hope to accomplish with this blog and my other marketing communications — educating consumers of building and design services about their options.  I want them to understand that 3D renderings aren’t just some TV magic on home design shows like “Hidden Potential”, but that they’re available to anyone who understands the value in “seeing it before you build it.”

3D Renderings for All!” is my new motto.


Like our blog? Visit our website, castleview3d.com, for more 3D deliciousness!


How to estimate the value of 3D visualization

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I was talking recently with a potential client, a builder from New Jersey, about doing some 3D renderings for him and his clients.  He was very impressed with the quality of my work, but when we got around to discussing prices, he balked.

He said, “Down here people aren’t willing to pay a lot for 3D renderings, although they can see the value of them immediately.”  I’d like to say I was shocked, but unfortunately this was not the first time I’d heard a statement like that — and not just from New Jersey.

So how does someone make a decision about “value” and the price they’re willing to pay for something they admittedly perceive as being of value to them?

A current client recently called to rave about the benefits of 3D visualization for him and his wife in the process of remodeling and redecorating their home:

  • saves money
  • saves time
  • aids decision-making
  • reduces aggravation
  • improves communication
  • eliminates costly re-dos and change orders
  • increases peace of mind

I’d say those things are priceless!  This couple feels that, for their money, 3D visualization offers a great return on investment.

3D Rendering by CastleView 3D.com - Entry hall from great room

3D Rendering by CastleView 3D

I recently conducted some impromptu focus groups with women attending a higher education conference. All of them were well-educated, all were homeowners, and all at some point had either built or remodeled their home — sometimes numerous times. But before our discussion, the majority of these women were not even aware that 3D visualization was an option for them — they thought it was just high-end pixel magic they had seen on HGTV or in million-dollar architectural presentations!

As we talked, their feeling was that 3D visualization and renderings would be of such value to them in their building and remodeling projects that they would be willing to pay 5-10% of the total cost of the project, depending on size and complexity, to be able to actually see and make decisions about their project in advance.  That’s quite a different story than the one I got from the New Jersey builder and others.

So, how do you approach the value proposition?  How do you decide what’s it worth to be able to “see it before you build it”?


Like our blog? Visit our website, castleview3d.com, for more 3D deliciousness!


3D Rendering with Chief Architect

Posted by , CastleView 3D | Like CastleView 3D on Facebook

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Today I’m featuring a guest post from a 3D colleague, Patricia Abood, Owner and Chief Artist at 3D-Diva.  Pat is a talented 3D artist who creates renders exclusively for users of Chief Architect software.  The images below are examples of her work.


Did you know that many photographs you see in a magazine or on a website aren’t really a photograph? How can you tell? Sometimes you can’t. It’s called 3D rendering.

3D Rendering by Patricia Abood of a room designed by Chad Cardin


3D renderings are computer-generated pictures taken from models or “meshes” built within a modeling software [like Chief Architect]. Lines and curves are drawn to form a geometry so when the computer calculates all the angles, it creates an object that you can visually walk around, look at from behind, above, and so on. While the computer works hard making the calculations necessary to create a 3D object, the 3D rendering artist also works hard to make sure the computer understands what he or she wants it to do — and that’s called creativity.

I’ve actually had emails sent to me asking if I could “plug this diagram into a rendering program and make it look like 3D.”  I try to hold my laughter inside, but sometimes I laugh out loud.  I politely email back telling them that it doesn’t work that way, and that I have to actually draw their diagram in one program and then have another program generate the 3D image so that it will look like a photograph. Since I’m speaking to them via cyberspace, I unfortunately don’t get to see their look of confusion.

So what’s the big deal about 3D, you say? What if I told you that you could visually see the room you’re thinking about redecorating before you even start stripping that 1980’s wallpaper? Maybe your husband wants the spare room for his man-cave, and his idea of decorating is an old recliner in the middle of the room with the flat screen TV as the focal point, a compact refrigerator for drinks, and a leftover cabinet from your last remodel hanging on the wall to store his chips.

You, on the other hand, would like to be able to keep the door open to the man-cave when you have visitors. You have some great decorating ideas but can’t seem to get your point across. Let him see your design in 3D…. brilliant idea!

Men seem to be a little less picky when it comes to decorating and usually let the women do as they please, but there comes a time when too much foo-foo can take the wind out of any manly sail. Collaborating with one another with 3D images can merge two ideas into one that both can agree upon.

Of course I’m exaggerating, but even with the best design intentions, without 3D renderings you will never know what your idea will look like until the project is finished.

Architects, designers, and draftsmen are all climbing on board with 3Ds, showing off their work with realistic images — but not just any 3D image. A professional who spends hours, days, and weeks creating a floor plan wants a photorealistic image that is an appropriate reflection of their own talents. It’s like the parsley on the potatoes — presentation! Presentation, as well as how a professional markets their designs, is just as important as the design itself.

When I receive a floor plan from an architect, designer, or draftsman that was created in Chief Architect, I know how important it is for them to have a 3D rendering that reflects the hours they put into the design. The professionals give only their best to their clients, and a 3D rendering is a wonderful tool to display the best of their creation.

So the next time you see a photograph in a magazine and wonder if it’s real or not, it just may be a 3D render.


Thanks for sharing your thoughts and your images, Pat!


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The big question

Posted by , CastleView 3D:

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As I contemplate my impending leap of faith from a fairly cushy position in the ivory tower to the cut-throat world of self-employment as an artistic entrepreneur, I keep coming back to the big question, as delicately posed by my husband:

“But dear, how can you call it 3D visualization when what you’re creating is obviously flat and two-dimensional?”

Well, that IS an excellent question.  And I can see where he’s coming from.

To most people, the images of homes and interiors that I create look like photos (hence the term “photorealistic renderings“).  But the big answer to the big question is that I’m taking a flat floorplan — basically just a blueprint in the x-y plane — and through the magic of CAD software (Chief Architect X4, to be exact) I’m giving it an added dimension.  Height!  The z dimension!

So a simple kitchen floorplan goes from looking like a bunch of lines on graph paper, like this

Kitchen floor plan drawn in Chief Architect by CastleView3D.com

Kitchen floor plan

to a beautiful rendering like THIS:

3D Visualization of Kitchen floor plan by CastleView3D.com

Kitchen floorplan converted to 3D visualization

3D visualization is a way to convey more information about design — a tool to improve communication between home owners and their designers, builders, remodelers, contractors, realtors, decorators, and others.

And to me, that seems like a very valuable service.  Enough to inspire a leap of faith.


Like our blog? Visit our website, castleview3d.com, for more 3D deliciousness!