Tag Archives: interior design

Reasons for NOT using 3D images for your building or remodeling project

Posted by , CastleView 3D:

.

What are some reasons for NOT using 3D images for your project? 

There aren’t any. 

You might think cost could be a reason.  If so, then either:

  1. You haven’t fully understood the value of 3Ds, and/or
  2. You haven’t found the right professional to create them for you.

For help with #1, read How to estimate the value of 3D visualization, A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words, Deep thoughts on 3D Biz, or 3D Rendering with Chief Architect.  These posts from seasoned 3D designers and artists should make the cost to value ratio abundantly clear.

For help with #2, contact me at CastleView 3D, and if I’m not the right person for your project, I can refer you to one of the other professionals I know.

Other “reasons”:

  • Time:  See #1 above.
  • Scope:  See #1 and 2 above.
  • “I wouldn’t know who to ask or how to get started”:  See my answer to #2 above.
  • “My architect/builder/designer doesn’t do 3Ds”:  See my answer to #2 above.  There are many 3D design and rendering specialists who can work hand-in-hand with your current architect or builder, or we can work directly with you on images that you can use to improve communication with your builder.
  • “I’m not exactly sure what I want yet”:  See #2 above.  Some 3D professionals specialize in creating concept images to help you choose the features and design elements that are most important to you.

So you can see that there really are no valid reasons not to utilize 3D renderings and raytraces for your building, remodeling, or decorating project, unless you’re the type of person who enjoys big — and possibly unpleasant — surprises.

3D images are a valuable asset for improving communication, ultimately saving you time, money, AND sleepless nights!

3D Kitchen Rendering by CastleView3D.com

Kitchen Remodel -- Design by Louie Carter of Grayson Homes; 3D rendering by CastleView 3D


Like our blog? Visit our website, castleview3d.com, for more 3D deliciousness!


The ’80s called — they want their bathroom back!

By , CastleView 3D | Like CastleView 3D on Facebook

.

I recently got a call from a friend.  He and his wife are planning to put their house on the market soon, and are sprucing it up to get it ready to sell.  It’s a beautiful, unique builder’s home, situated high on a hill with an incredible view.  But the home was built in the 1980s, and some features have never been updated.

Their concern right now is the master bath.  It’s a lovely space with skylights, lots of mirrors, and a garden tub.  It has “good bones.”  But the cabinets and countertop are mauve-colored laminate.

In case you don’t know what “mauve” is (and trust me, you are not the only one), consider this definition from Wikipedia:  “Mauve (rhymes with “stove”) is a pale lavender-lilac color, one of many in the range of purples.  Mauve is more grey and more blue than a pale tint of magenta would be… Sometimes mauve can be considered a dirty pink or a shade of purple.  Mauve can also be described as pale violet.”

Well thanks, Wikipedia — that really clears things up.

1980s Mauve Laminate BathroomI think “grayish pink” actually comes closest in this case.  Mauve was a very popular color for decorating in the 1980s, particularly in business offices and dentist’s waiting rooms, and especially when combined with gray or teal.  (Did I mention that this bathroom has a gray tub and sinks?)  When my friends first bought the house, the same charming mauve laminate was also on all the kitchen cabinets and the dining room built-ins!  Mauve overload!  Luckily all of that was replaced early on.

My friends want to bring their bathroom into this millenium, but without spending a lot of money on it — just enough to make the bath a selling feature rather than a liability.  So they asked for my assistance in envisioning what a coat of paint over the laminate, a new solid surface countertop with vessel sinks, and new carpeting could do for the space.  CastleView 3D to the rescue!

After measuring the space and taking photos, I created a 3D model of their bath using Chief Architect.  I added the vessel sinks and Corian countertop they wanted, “painted” the mauve laminate cabinets a neutral shade of ivory, and put in a new carpet.  The raytraced images below show how much these small changes will improve and enhance their bath.  Goodbye, mauve!

3D Rendering of Bathroom Remodel by CastleView 3D

3D Rendering of Bathroom Remodel by CastleView 3D

3D Bathroom Rendering by CastleView3D.com

3D Rendering of Bathroom Remodel by CastleView 3D


Like our blog? Visit our website, castleview3d.com, for more 3D deliciousness!


Learning 3D modeling by copying the “old masters”

By , CastleView 3D | Like CastleView 3D on Facebook

.

When I was first learning to do 3D modeling and rendering back in 2007, I decided to try an exercise that many art students are given in their studies:  learning by copying the old masters.  With sketchbooks and pencils in hand, students visit the world’s great art museums to learn about an artist’s technique by trying to duplicate it themselves.

For my learning exercise, I decided that my “old masters” would be architectural and interior designers whose work I admired.  So I gathered a collection of photos from the web, many from Architectural Digest (which is, in my opinion, the best place to see consistently fine examples of both interior and exterior design).  I set myself the task of trying to learn something about their design techniques, as well as mastering my own modeling and rendering software tools, by trying to reproduce the photos as 3D renderings. I feel this approach really taught me a lot, and I highly recommend it to anyone wanting to improve their 3D skills.

Now that I’ve been at this for almost 4 years, I still occasionally do this exercise, simply because it provides an excellent insight into a designer’s mind to try to understand why they did things the way they did in the building or room I’m studying.

Room designed by Suzanne Lovell

Room designed by interior designer Suzanne Lovell (photo from an article in Sept. 2007 Architectural Digest)

Recently, instead of tackling a new challenge, I decided to revisit one of my old favorite inspirations, a lovely room created by awesomely talented interior designer Suzanne Lovell in her own townhouse in Chicago.  Her home was written up in a 2007 article in AD (which unfortunately is no longer available online).

I liked my original rendering so much that I had been using it for years in my portfolio on the CastleView 3D website, despite the fact that it was a very early example and wasn’t actually produced for a real client.  But because the rendering software I use now (Kerkythea) is much more sophisticated than what I was using in 2007, I wanted to see how much the image could be improved simply by using the new tool.

I didn’t change my original model except to import it into Chief Architect X3 (to enable VRML export), but instead spent time tweaking the lighting and textures in the imported file within Kerkythea.  Below is a comparison of my original image with the most recent one (you’ll need to click to enlarge the images for a decent comparison).  You can see that in the 2007 version, the render engine wasn’t able to produce reflections, or even shadows!

2011 3D Rendering by CastleView3D.com of room designed by Suzanne Lovell

My recent update (April 2011), using the same model but re-rendered in Kerkythea

2007 3D Rendering by CastleView3D.com of room designed by Suzanne Lovell

My original 2007 rendering, modeled and rendered in Home Designer Pro

Of course I’m much happier with the more recent version, although as I look at the final product there are still things I would like to change in my addictive quest for photorealistic perfection.

Perhaps I’ll work on improving some of my original modeling, and post an update later. But in the meantime, this new image is definitely replacing the old one on my website!


Like our blog? Visit our website, castleview3d.com, for more 3D deliciousness!